What the Christian-Atheist Debate is Not

A lot of the dispute between atheists and Christians over the existence of God, the inerrancy of Scripture and other theological issues are sometimes a mistakenly invested conversation on objectivity/subjectivity and the evidence. For instance, we often hear from atheists that if there were evidence for the existence of God or what have you, then by virtue of their epistemic standards they would accept the conclusion that God exists. Unfortunately, no evidence either (1) has been provided to them by Christians or (2) exists.

It’s not so much an issue of trying to undermine (1) and (2) but rather show how those two conditions are misleading in the conversation. If an atheist concedes that he could convert to Christianity if only the evidence were substantial and pointed towards that direction, then I would point out here that the atheist – even if he were to convert – is not displaying a matter of conversion from atheism to Christianity on the basis of the evidence.

The debate should not center around the evidence more than it should the heart. For a human individual to make that decisive declaration that “Jesus is Lord” he has not jumped from one conclusion to another; he has rather had a transformation of the heart.

Christians should not only utilize but take note of this transformation in the Gospel conversation. I would personally say that taking the (object) facts and presenting them to an individual subject can have its merits for the Holy Spirit’s using, but that mere presentation can often have very little consideration for the (spiritual) condition of the person.

Advertisements

One response to “What the Christian-Atheist Debate is Not

  1. Pingback: A Few Thoughts on Truth and Faith | Hellenistic Christendom·

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s